Technology and Resources for Working with Students with Varying Exceptionalities

Sharing

Seminars

Target Audience

  • Clinicians
  • Community Members
  • Technology Experts
  • Parents & Families
  • Primary and Secondary Educators
  • Youth
  • Professionals

Synopsis

This seminar will begin with an overview of the literature on technology in the field of special education. The presenters will share information on the impact of technology, how technology can provide both access and barriers, and how they are vital for practitioners in special education because they are linked with increasing motivation, facilitating student learning, and allowing individualized interventions/instruction/assessments.

Following the presentation of literature, the presenters will provide an overview and demonstration of several special education technological resources for students, families, and practitioners across four domains (language/communication; psychosocial skills; cultural and linguistic diversity; academic content). Interactive technology that can assist students with sensory and access challenges by increasing their communication and overall language skills; games and activities via software applications can assist with self-regulation and advocacy as well as other psychosocial skills; incorporating culturally responsive teaching techniques via internet resources (e.g., video conferencing; webinars; vlogs/blogs; social media) for students with special needs who are culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) and their classmates (with and without disabilities); and the vast array of technology resources surrounding academic content (e.g., simulations of experiments, activities, journeys, etc.; youtube video libraries on specific topics; online discussion forums) to increase knowledge and expectations for students with special needs will be presented.

The presenters will share their experiences using cutting-edge technology across all four domains to individualize instruction when working with students with varying exceptionalities (e.g., d/Deaf and hard of hearing; blindness and visual impairment; learning disabilities; behavioral issues) and in various settings (i.e., general education, inclusion, self-contained, and special schools).

In conclusion, we will invite audience members to contribute to the seminar by sharing their experiences of using varying technological resources in the aforementioned domains.

 

Learning Outcomes

 Participants will:

  1. Understand how technology influences and impacts accessibility and accommodations for K-12 students with varying exceptionalities
  2. Learn about various free and low cost technological resources (e.g., apps, websites, games) through a review and demonstration by the presenters
  3. Evaluate technology resources across four domains (language/communication; psychosocial skills; cultural and linguistic diversity; academic content), varying exceptionalities (e.g., d/Deaf and hard of hearing; blindness and visual impairment; learning disabilities; behavioral issues), and various settings (i.e., general education, inclusion, self-contained, and special schools).

 

Seminar Leaders

Photo: Dr. Caroline Guardino

Dr. Caroline Guardino is an Associate Professor and the Director of the Deaf Education Program at the University of North Florida. Her research interests involve literacy/technology and deafness as well as the inclusive learning environment for all children with disabilities She enjoys teaching courses in both Exceptional Student and Deaf Education as this combined knowledge provides a platform for her passion to provide pre-service teachers with better services and strategies to use with students who are Deaf with Disabilities (DWD; www.understandingdad.org ).

Photo: Dr. Joanna E. Cannon

Dr. Joanna E. Cannon is an Associate Professor in the Educational and Counselling Psychology and Special Education department at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver. She completed her Ph.D. after teaching deaf and hard of hearing students in middle school as an itinerant and resource teacher for 9 years. Dr. Cannon is the co-director of the Education of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing Graduate Program where she teaches the language, literacy, and curriculum courses. Her areas of research include grammar and literacy acquisition for students who are deaf and hard of hearing.